Direction in Donne’s Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward

Two central motifs which shape John Donne’s Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward make the poem challenging for contemporary readers: cosmology and liturgy. To some degree, they are a single motif, as the poem seems to argue. The poem, a meditation on the Crucifixion and the narrator’s spiritual condition, is set in the context of the motion … Continue reading Direction in Donne’s Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward

On Maritain’s Person and the Common Good

In adjudicating between two opposite errors of political (and thus anthropological) philosophy, Jacque Maritain capitalizes on the distinction between our material individuality and our personhood. These are not, as he points out, two separate realities, but two aspects of one reality. By the fact of our materiality, we are individuals: needy, fragile, and insufficient of … Continue reading On Maritain’s Person and the Common Good

Samson and the Cross

Judges 16:23-31 “Our god has delivered Samson, our enemy, into our hands,” said the Philistines. But Samson prayed and received the Spirit of God. He stretched forth his arms and allowed the Temple of Dagon to crush him, that he might bring down that house, so that the house of Israel might rise.   Continue reading Samson and the Cross