The Poetics of Faith and Learning, Part 3

We saw that the study of Euclid can serve as an archetype of contemplative learning and that learning is itself personal and Trinitarian. Let’s slow down now and reflect upon how this might influence our own learning and teaching. Further Up and Further In Personal learning implies depth, depth which emerges in dialogue, and this requires more than frozen facts. Dialogue involves speech. … Continue reading The Poetics of Faith and Learning, Part 3

The Poetics of Faith and Learning, Part 1

Euclid The study of Euclid’s Elements serves as an excellent example of the contemplative learning process. Proposition 5, an early proposition in the text, marks a turning point for most students, where they must not only identify a chain of equalities (something akin to a hypothetical syllogism), but do so in transposition. Whereas students needed only identify equality by imposing … Continue reading The Poetics of Faith and Learning, Part 1

The Mystery of Marriage in Anna Karenina

In one of the most touching sections of Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, the recently married Konstantin Levin is repeatedly mystified by his wife Kitty’s behavior. She bustles about his country estate, rearranging the household, changing table cloths, moving furniture, and establishing dining routines. While he cannot comprehend the meaning of her activity, he sees that it engrosses her, and he tolerates it. … Continue reading The Mystery of Marriage in Anna Karenina

Logocentric Restoration: The Cosmic Gift of Repentance

When Nathan confronts David concerning his sin with Bathsheba, the Scriptures present us with a model of divine restoration. God mercifully restores the fallen king through His prophet, Nathan. Nathan does this by re-contextualizing the law within a framework of affections and relationships. He does this in order to help David reestablish himself within such a framework. In this scriptural … Continue reading Logocentric Restoration: The Cosmic Gift of Repentance